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Welcome to the Pure Land Centre News. This page contains a list of news in reverse chronological order (most recent first)


Helping Others at the Time of Death Is a Big Responsibility

Helping the Dying a Big Responsibility

Lama Zopa Rinpoche, in his book How to Enjoy Death says that a good rebirth depends upon dying peacefully, with virtuous thoughts. If we die with anger, strong attachment or fear, our births will only be in the lower realms.

Lama Zopa: “Therefore the people surrounding the person who is dying – friends, family, professional caregivers – have a big responsibility. I will put it this way: Whatever arises in your loved one’s mind, whether their thoughts are virtuous or non-virtuous, very much depends on you and the other helpers, how you behave toward them. It is a great responsibility. If you are not careful, if you do not have this education – that the way you behave affects the mind of the person and therefore their future life – you will only harm them, not help them.”

For more on this topic see Helping the dying a big responsibility.


Book Review – How to Enjoy Death by Lama Zopa Rinpoche

Book Review – How to Enjoy Death by Lama Zopa Rinpoche

How to Enjoy Death
Preparing to Meet Life’s Final Challenge Without Fear

by Lama Zopa Rinpoche
compiled and edited by Robina Courtin
Wisdom Publications: Somerville USA 2016

Sooner or later, you will come face to face with your own death. And maybe before then, someone who is near and dear to you will die. Today you may say, “Oh, I’ll deal with death when the time comes. I’m not worried.” But when the end is near, for you or a loved one, chances are you will be upset, afraid, regretful of lost opportunities, unable to think straight, and not sure what to do.

That is when you can turn to this marvellous book, How to Enjoy Death, and easily find some simple advice, distilled into everyday language by Robina Courtin, from forty-five years of wise and practical teachings by Lama Zopa Rinpoche.

However, it may take a close brush with death for you to realize then that it may be too late to wait till the Lord of Death knocks on your door, and that what you really need to do is to prepare yourself now, without delay. With that positive motivation, there is no better reference book to guide your investigations and your actions than How to Enjoy Death.

It is a beautifully presented book, with gold edges to the pages and the feel of a precious resource. Why is it precious? Lama Zopa Rinpoche explains why from the Buddhist viewpoint, death is important: “Helping our loved ones at the time of death is the best service we can offer them, our greatest gift. Why? Because death is the most important time of life: it’s at death the next rebirth is determined.”

Lama Zopa Rinpoche begins by teaching us how to think about death and rebirth, the stages of the death process, and the spiritual opportunity that occurs as you die. Next, Rinpoche gives targeted advice on what to do before death, including what to see and touch, what to think about, what to hear, what to meditate on, and what to do when the breath stops. Next are clear instructions about what to do after the breath has stopped but the mind is still in the body. Lastly, Rinpoche explains what to do after the mind has left the body.

To sample the clarity and wisdom in Rinpoche’s book, follow the link to We Must Prepare for Death


Fiona Stanley Hospital – Pastoral Care Week – Meditation

Fiona Stanley Hospital – Pastoral Care Week – Meditation

Sue and Len participated in the Pastoral Care Week activity at Fiona Stanley Hospital yesterday, 25 October. All the brochures we took for Hayagriva Buddhist Centre and the Pure Land of the Indestructible Buddha were distributed. A short meditation, entitled Simple practice for those who are sick or dying, was conducted.

Click here to read the text of the meditation Simple practice for those who are sick or dying (PDF)


Fiona Stanley Hospital – Pastoral Care Week – 25 Oct 2017

Fiona Stanley Hospital – Pastoral Care Week – 25 Oct 2017

Fiona Stanley Hospital – Pastoral Care Week
Buddhism
Wednesday 25th October, 11.30am – 1.30 pm

Fiona Stanley Hospital is holding a Pastoral Care Week and between 11:30 am and 1:30 pm on Wednesday 25 October. The Buddhist faith has been invited to make presentations to staff and visitors in a gazebo near the food court.

Dr Geetha Mendis from the Buddhist Society of WA is organising the event and invited us to participate. The program is given below.

Fiona Stanley Hospital – Pastoral Care Week
Buddhism
Wednesday 25th October, 11.30am – 1.30 pm

PROGRAM
MC – Dennis Sheppard, Buddhist Society of WA

11.30 –
Introductory comments by MC, welcoming everyone to come to our presentation and ask questions. We will try to convey a flavour of Buddhism and the diversity of traditions within Buddhism due to its spread across many nations. Some guided meditations will be conducted for all to participate and experience inner peace and well being.
11.40 –
Loving Kindness Chant – a discourse by the Buddha, translated to English, chanted by Shamara
11.50 –
Songs from Thich Nhat Hahn , A Vietnamese Buddhist teacher. “breathing in, breathing out” – sung by Shamara
12.00 –
Guided Meditation- by Kanthi. Use of Loving Kindness and Mindfulness in daily life
12.15 –
“Can you hear the Mountain Stream?” A Zen Buddhist Poem – recited by Shamara, accompanied by harp.
12.30 –
A guided meditation for use by those caring for the sick – by Len, Hayagriva Tibetan Buddhist Centre
12.50 –
Loving Kindness Chant (repeat)- Shamara
1.00 –
Guided Meditation, learning to be in the present –by Dennis
1.20 –
Songs by Shamara and /or Tibetan Chanting
1.30 –
Closing Thank You.

Throughout the session the information desk will be attended. There will be finger foods, opportunities for questions, and free information booklets


What will happen to me while dying, at death and afterwards?

What will happen to me while dying, at death and afterwards?

Presentation by the Pure Land Project

Where: Hayagriva Buddhist Centre, 64 Banksia Tce, Kensington, 6023

Have you ever wondered what will happen to you during your dying and death? What will you feel; will your experience be frightening or blissful?

Over three Thursday evenings in September we will introduce the Tibetan Buddhist perspective on these questions. We will start with a guided meditation, then open the meeting to a discussion on the topic. The evening will conclude with a short presentation on the proposed centre for those who wish for a spiritual focus during their last weeks, called the Pure Land of the Indestructible Buddha.

Presentations will be made by Len Warren and members of the Pure Land Committee.

The aim is to start at 7:30 pm and finish about 8:30 pm. Entry is by donation.

The program is as follows:

14 September 7.30 to 8.30pm
What will happen to me during my last weeks?
A Tibetan Buddhist Perspective

21 September 7.30 to 8.30pm
What will happen to me as I die?
 
A Tibetan Buddhist Perspective

28 September 7.30 to 8.30pm
What will happen to me after I die?
 
A Tibetan Buddhist Perspective

The Tibetan Buddhist tradition is rich with teachings about dying, death and the intermediate state or bardo between this life and the next. In this series we will only touch the surface of this storehouse of wisdom. We also want to introduce the project to build a centre – the Pure Land of the Indestructible Buddha – that will meet some of the needs of the dying identified in the teachings by Lama Zopa Rinpoche.